Viewing entries tagged
un-office

Hoteling, Hot-Desking and the Un-Office

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Hoteling, Hot-Desking and the Un-Office

Hoteling, also known as unassigned seating in office space programming, is becoming increasingly popular. Many have attributed it to decreased operating costs, i.e. less desks dedicated to employees equals less space needed. However, lately creative and technology firms have adopted this office space model, as companies look to make unique design choices for their employees environment’s. Companies are now viewing office space as an extension of the home and are seeking to create more comfortable spaces for their employees. 

Would you choose a cubicle or a cafe?   

When you’re at your house do you always sit in the same chair? 

If given the choice, people generally choose a office space best suited to the task they are working on or group they are working with. Companies are catching on. They’ve started to notice that promoting comfortable work environments, usually leads to better work and happier employees. This new trend in hoteling (without assigned desks) is now being called “hot-desking”.  Several months ago we were meeting with Jarrod Arbini from Weaver Architects and he referred to it as the “Un-Office”.  Whatever you want to call it, it is becoming the latest trend in office space planning.  What was once was thought of a way to decrease overhead costs is actually becoming a way to attract the best talent, and a new and possibly better way for people to work.

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Exposed Office Space

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Exposed Office Space

Goodbye acoustical tile, vanilla walls and drab carpet! For years covering up structure was perceived as high-end and modern. Today there is a new trend in office space. Almost every cool, creative company (or those that want to be) are asking for exposed ceilings, brick & beam and polished concrete. Why is this new look so appealing? It’s not your parent’s office! 

Most companies are leaning towards an open environment that allows for more flexibility and teamwork. So why not go the extra stretch and not only knock down the thick walls, but also strip away all of the old second generation space. The space ends up feeling more like a loft than an office. It is reflective of the people working there, creating and designing, versus an uninspired vanilla box. 

The only downside – cost. Many tenants think exposed ceilings are cheaper, but in reality all of the cleanup involved to make them look nice can be very expensive and take up a significant portion of your tenant improvement allowance. Is it worth it? Below are photos of several Seattle office tenants... We’ll let you decide…

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Where's My Work Beer?

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Where's My Work Beer?

Just another day at the office…Several months ago we visited Twitter’s office in San Francisco, where we noticed multiple beer fridges on every floor. When we asked an employee how they regulate consumption, he said “It’s on an honor system…we don’t.”  

We’ve seen an increasing number of companies talking about bars on tours and planning them in their space. In fact, we recently moved our office space to WeWork in South Lake Union where they offer local rotating kegs with free beer on tap.

So what’s with this new trend or rather a throwback to an earlier era?  Workdays, especially for technology, media and start-up companies, are stretching past happy hour. As a perk to lure talent, keep employees late and encourage social and work hours to blur, companies are installing beer fridges, stocking full bars, and even putting speakeasies and full taverns.  Check out these Seattle office bars…

WeWork | South Lake Union

We Work a co-working office space in South Lake Union and many major markets offers its members free beer around the clock and weekly networking happy hours.

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Eggs and Private Offices - Good or Bad

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Eggs and Private Offices - Good or Bad

We recently met with Shannon and Kyle Gaffney at SkB Architects and they brought up a good point, health opinions regarding eggs are constantly changing (keep reading… this is going somewhere). It seems like every month we hear a different health view regarding egg yolks – good cholesterol, bad cholesterol, which is it?!

Similarly we’ve seen this trend in office space, as private offices become less of a status symbol and companies tear down their cubicle walls. However, the result can make private conversations and trying to hear yourself think pretty unbearable.

To solve this issue companies are starting to add small meeting rooms and phone rooms, which allow for private conversations and team collaboration, but still keep people together. Similarly, Seattle building owners are thinking about this in their lobbies and adding in lounge and retail space to fill this need.  Check out what these Seattle tenants and owners are doing…

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