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hot-desking

Hoteling, Hot-Desking and the Un-Office

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Hoteling, Hot-Desking and the Un-Office

Hoteling, also known as unassigned seating in office space programming, is becoming increasingly popular. Many have attributed it to decreased operating costs, i.e. less desks dedicated to employees equals less space needed. However, lately creative and technology firms have adopted this office space model, as companies look to make unique design choices for their employees environment’s. Companies are now viewing office space as an extension of the home and are seeking to create more comfortable spaces for their employees. 

Would you choose a cubicle or a cafe?   

When you’re at your house do you always sit in the same chair? 

If given the choice, people generally choose a office space best suited to the task they are working on or group they are working with. Companies are catching on. They’ve started to notice that promoting comfortable work environments, usually leads to better work and happier employees. This new trend in hoteling (without assigned desks) is now being called “hot-desking”.  Several months ago we were meeting with Jarrod Arbini from Weaver Architects and he referred to it as the “Un-Office”.  Whatever you want to call it, it is becoming the latest trend in office space planning.  What was once was thought of a way to decrease overhead costs is actually becoming a way to attract the best talent, and a new and possibly better way for people to work.

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Eggs and Private Offices - Good or Bad

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Eggs and Private Offices - Good or Bad

We recently met with Shannon and Kyle Gaffney at SkB Architects and they brought up a good point, health opinions regarding eggs are constantly changing (keep reading… this is going somewhere). It seems like every month we hear a different health view regarding egg yolks – good cholesterol, bad cholesterol, which is it?!

Similarly we’ve seen this trend in office space, as private offices become less of a status symbol and companies tear down their cubicle walls. However, the result can make private conversations and trying to hear yourself think pretty unbearable.

To solve this issue companies are starting to add small meeting rooms and phone rooms, which allow for private conversations and team collaboration, but still keep people together. Similarly, Seattle building owners are thinking about this in their lobbies and adding in lounge and retail space to fill this need.  Check out what these Seattle tenants and owners are doing…

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